1

/
Jennifer
info

Jennifer

I had a rough childhood growing up in the Bronx. My parents were both drug addicts, they were there but not mentally so I spent most of the time with my older sister who dropped out of school to raise me. I was a selective mute choosing not to speak until I was five or six.

I didn’t like the atmosphere around me and I sensed things weren’t right. This made me a very lonely child and at 10 years of age it dawned on me that I had to fend for myself so at that very early age I found a job packing bags.

I was never incarcerated but I had a lot of close calls and it was a pretty big scare that finally stopped me from doing bad things. I still remember the day I was selling drugs at the park and something told me to leave, moments later the cops stormed in and arrested everyone in the park and I had just gotten away in time. I had so many drugs on me that day that I would have been put away for the rest of my life. It was a wake-up call but I was 19 and I was still in self-destructive mode so nothing meant anything to me.

I did stop selling drugs but I was fighting the whole time, that was just part of being a gang member and it was only when I got pregnant with my son that I decided to put a stop to that way of life and I went to a pregnancy shelter. They skipped me all over the place until I got section 8 and was able to live in my own apartment for a while.

I adopted my middle child after I was dating her father but he became abusive so I ran to a domestic violence shelter and stayed there for a long while.

When he found out that I was pregnant with my current husband he was furious and managed to find me but they ended up arresting him. It was then that Providence house took me in.

I’m not where I used to be, I’m not where I want to be but I’m better than where I was. I came here with nothing and now I have everything.

2

/
Beverly
info

Beverly

I fell into the world of drug life which got me incarcerated. I took the wrap for another person and did 5 years in jail. During the last year of incarceration I found out that I had breast cancer. Being that I'm sick some days I don't feel like doing anything, some days it's hard. I'm a very creative person and when all is said and done I want to open up my own art and crafts store with my name on it. I love the sisters at Providence House, just by listening to them gave me hope.

3

/
Yolanda
info

Yolanda

At 7 I was separated from my mom, that's when all my problems began. I had my daughter when I was 20 years old, my whole life was my daughter. I was clinically depressed after loosing my job, there wasn't any money, my husband was selling PCP (Phencyclidine or angel dust). Instead of searching for help he let me take PCP and one day after I smoked it, two people got hurt, one fatally. The doctors called it a psychotic episode, I woke up hand cuffed to a hospital bed, at the foot of the bed was a newspaper with me on the front cover. That's how I learned what happened. I was incarcerated for 13 years. I fell in love with Providence House from the first day I arrived. When I get a better job I'm going to move out but I'll always come back and sit on the porch and help with the garden.

 

4

/
Malika

5

/
Lisa
info

Lisa

In my late thirties I started smoking crack, it was much cheaper than cocaine. I was lost for a very long time, I slept in hallways, stair wells and on rooftops. I looked like a walking skeleton. I met this guy, he gave me a phone and the drugs and all I had to do was deliver. I was set up and did 10 months in jail. From there I came straight to Providence House, the sisters were nice and the food was good! Just them being there by my side and listening to me, watching me cry and be confused and angry pretty much made me a better person.

6

/
Nora

7

/
Johaniazia
info

Johniazia

The truth is, I don’t really know where I was born. I had a bouncy childhood too, I lived all over the place, Harlem, Georgia, Bermuda, New Jersey and as long as I can remember I had to defend myself so I’ve never been a child really.

When I was in third grade my mom worked the nightshift so my older brother was left in charge but often he would go out.

I dozed off one night on the couch and woke up with stinging eyes finding the whole house was full of smoke (at school they had taught us what to do in case of fire after a girl called Maria had died because she’d hidden under the bed when she saw the flames) I went towards my baby brother thinking I’ve got to get him out, I can’t leave him just like Maria. I jumped over the chairs through the kitchen over the fire into my brother’s room then jumped back across holding on to him. Then I went to the other bedroom to wake up my other brother who has cerebral palsy, I was screaming for him to wake up. I remember just going out and closing the door behind me thinking, now what?

We were scooped up by a neighbor and then the fire trucks arrived, I was seven years old.

I never had problems at school it was my escape from home and I actually despised Christmas holidays and breaks.

My teenage years were even rougher than my childhood, I was 12 when we moved back to New York and I was on a risky path. At 14 I ran away, I didn’t want to be my mum’s house slave anymore or a built-in babysitter and I was ready to go, so I left. I was gone for eight days without going to school, I stayed with my mom’s best friend which ended up ruining their relationship.

At 16 I moved out for good, it was the best and worst thing I ever did. A year later I was living with the father of my daughter but things got bad and I left to go into a domestic violence center.

When I first got to Providence house I was pissed, I sat on the steps with my baby daughter in the snow because for legal reasons they couldn’t take me in but finally they did.

I’m the kind of person who never gets angry on the outside but inside I could be planning your demise. I’m on guard with every single thing but I don’t want to be this way, I just want to be able to let people in, love and be loved.

Having a daughter has changed me, I’ve been on the crappy end of parenting so I want to make sure she never feels like I did. I want to have a healthy relationship and make sure she never goes through anything I went through with my mum.

Over the years there have been so many things that have been aimed at me sending me rock bottom but I’ve always managed to overcome, things that other people would have committed suicide over.

Now with my husband we are able to co-parent for the good of my daughter. She was born with five cysts on her brain, she’s had surgery four times and suffers from diabetes along with several neurological issues but my daughter is here, she’s strong.

Homeless doesn’t mean dirty, homeless doesn’t mean cracked out. In my instance homeless means domestic violence finally had enough. This is where I am to get on my feet, I’m not ashamed of my situation because all of this is temporary.

At school I was good at writing and that’s what I still do today. I write everything I do, it’s the only way to vent. I have loads of note books full of notes from my life which I use in my songs. I’m not a singer I rap! So when I need some lyrics I go through my notes but I don’t write about my past or problems, I want to give off good vibes in my songs.

I was immediately welcomed and embraced here as a woman going through trials in life. They do their best to make sure you don’t feel down on yourself because of your circumstances. It’s a family-based environment and it feels like home.

8

/
Blessing
info

Blessing

 

I was born in Nigeria. When my mum and dad separated, he left the house so I went and stayed with him and my step mom in Edu, they stopped sending me to school when I was 10 years old to save money.

It was very tough growing up without my mother. My stepmom was not friendly at all, she would tell me to do all the house chores and I did them because I didn’t want her to flog me.

When I was a teenager I used to run away from home because of the maltreatment. I would go to my friend’s house but every time they would bring me back and flog me.

My real mom was in London trying to make money to send us but the money never came. All my sisters were scattered around other families so the love wasn’t there and growing up was Hell.

I started to get sick and for this reason people at school started avoiding me, I was getting asthma and often they would have to rush me to the hospital at night.

I used to see my step mom travel to America with her children but she always left me behind at the airport even though I spent my life looking after my stepsisters.

When I got pregnant with Emma the doctors told me that I risked dying with the pregnancy, my grandmother wanted me to be circumcised again to have the child even though I was already circumcised as a baby, luckily my mom stood up for me and took me away, she told me that in America there were good doctors. I was 27 when she bought me a ticket and told me that my auntie was waiting for me in Texas. Soon after I arrived I called a friend in New York asking for help and she said come. Emma was one month when we arrived but soon this person drove me out of the house.

A lady at the church told me to go to the shelter but I was scared they would send me back to Nigeria but I decided to go. The first shelter I went to was terrible it wasn’t like here, it was hell.

I prayed every day to be independent and have a house of my own. At Providence House I feel like I’m starting a new life, a good life with my daughter and I’d love to go back to school and learn to read to become a nurse.

I’ve got this far and every time I look at my daughter I think that I don’t want her to have the kind of life I’ve had. She gives me strength!

9

/
Shellyann

10

/
Sushana

11

/
Rosalie
info

Rosalie

I was a shy girl and got into abusive relationships. I'm a firm believer that an abuser picks his victim, he doesn't want a strong woman. He wants someone he can rule over. I spent 27 years in prison. I was 42. I'm not bitter about it and I'm very accepting of things because I'm a survivor not a victim. It was important to see women leave, win appeals and clemencies, I knew that one day I would be walking through those gates. And I did. I found a way to survive by studying. Inside I worked for Sister Elaine, a founder of Providence House, she was a bright light in there. When I got out, all the women were screaming and at the door the officer hugged me. One moment you are behind bars the next you are out in another dimension. There I was at 70 jumping in a car and driving away.

12

/
Delores
info

Delores

My earliest memory is going to the pool when I was a kid and I loved playing baseball.

Growing up in our house was mostly very dull, everything was just days in and out, I used to clean, pick up my siblings from school and nothing exciting ever broke the routine. Look, life happens.

I came to New York when I was 21 and I had my daughter but life in New York changed nothing for me, it was just like living in Savanah Georgia.

We were having problems in the family, you know it’s hard living with somebody... so me and my daughter had to find somewhere else to go. When we came in to Providence House they really helped me. I love this place, they should have more of them for people that are having it rough in life.

13

/
Antone
info

Antone

I got to Providence House with my mom, it was full of children and it was exciting to me, I was young and i never realized anything was wrong. My mom hid everything that was going on and I appreciate that now. Kids don't need to know everything

14

/
Shanequa
info

Shanequa

I was like an adult since the age of 4, I raised my two younger brothers from 11 months onwards. I went into foster care until I was 21. After that I stayed in various places until one day boom, I was homeless. I stayed in a shelter at night but during the day me and my baby daughter were out in the cold. I had no money, only a duffle bag of clothes and groceries for my kid to eat. She knew nothing except that we were on the bus a lot. We arrived at Providence House on Christmas Eve, on Christmas day my daughter got to open presents.

15

/
Halisha
info

Halisha

 

I was raised by my grandparents in a quiet country setting of Pennsylvania

My grandfather used old sayings like “that red thing in your mouth will get you in trouble, so watch how you speak to people.”

I had my first child at 21 when I was in my prime, I should have been partying but she was a blessing and it made me responsible. 14 years later I had my first son who was born on the same day as my daughter, I remember my water broke just after we’d celebrated her birthday and she ended up taking me to the urgent care.

I got pregnant with my son just a couple of months after meeting his dad and that was the problem, we didn’t have time to learn about each other and I soon found myself in a domestic violence relationship.

He is a Muslim and I converted over to the Muslim faith so I was covered up, before then I was a Baptist, my grandfather was a deacon at the church.

I was very depressed just feeling down and sad about myself and I didn’t want anything from life so covering up was not even a problem for me because I felt so ashamed of myself. I did that for four years.

My husband would continuously put me down, he was very possessive and controlling saying “this is my stuff and what I buy is mine.” My breaking point was when he wanted me to sleep on the floor and not in the bed, he continued saying “everything is mine, get a job, I pay for everything.” I was tired of that and one day I started praying to the lord, not to Allah.

I prayed every day and he brought me here to Brooklyn with nothing but a bag, a stroller and the two kids.

I finally uncovered and I’m finding myself now, regaining who I am and taking my life back. The strangest thing for me here was riding the subway, I’d only ever travelled in a car out in the mountains.

I’ve always wanted to provide for myself and at last I got hired, it’s a job in the city which I start on Monday. I’m also looking into going back to school, I think I’d like to train to be an ultrasound technician and someday relocate to be near my daughter.

Providence house serves to transition women who are homeless and recently released from incarceration back into society. The organization is not institutional but run by the religious Sisters who founded and still perform many of the essential duties within the houses around New York.

The women at these houses are in an exceptionally volatile moment of their lives, most having just left prison, some having served long sentences, others victims of domestic violence and homelessness. This is a temporary safe haven for the women here, in that short time they are guided to find the means to overcome their fragile state of being acquiring the tools to face the hostile and uncertain future beyond the boundaries of the house.

The stories they told of their pasts were often harrowing and upsetting but their hope for a better future was a common thread.

Back to Top
Women Of Providence House

15